Historical Football Kits

 

FIFA World Cup

Russia 2018

world cup 2018 posterIn December 2010 Russia and Qatar were chosen by the FIFA Executive Committee to host the 2018 and 2022 competitions to the fury of the FA and the football federations of Netherlands/Belgium and Spain/Portugal who had spent tens of millions to put together their own bids. Almost immediately allegations surfaced of corruption and vote trading.

In 2015 FIFA President Sepp Blatter, with typical total lack of self-awareness, revealed that an agreement was in place even before the vote was taken to ensure that Russia would get the 2018 World Cup and the United States the 2022 competition. "Everything was good until the moment when Sarkozy (the French President) came in a meeting with the crown prince of Qatar...and at a lunch afterwards with Mr Platini (then President of UEFA) he said it would be good to go to Qatar," Blatter told the Russian news agency TASS.

Meanwhile FIFA was engulfed as two decades of global corruption, vote rigging, racketeering and bribery involving convoluted financial deals and briefcases full of cash came home to roost. Swiss police arrested a number of senior FIFA officials while the FBI announced criminal charges against 18 people and two corporations. Under considerable pressure from FIFA's sponsors, Blatter finally "resigned" in June 2015 three days after winning a fifth term as president but announced he would stay in office until a replacement could be chosen the following February. In October Blatter was suspended from his position and two months later he was formally ejected and banned from taking part in any FIFA activity for eight years (later reduced to six).

Russia's bid came under scrutiny while further concerns arose due to racist chanting at Russian football grounds, perceived official discrimination against the LGBT community and state sponsored doping of athletes. Nevertheless, Blatters' successor, Gianni Infantino, confirmed in April 2016 that the tournament would go ahead as planned.

Absent from the finals were the Netherlands and Italy who, having made heavy weather of their qualifying groups, failed to negotiate the play-offs. Also missing were the reigning CONCACEF champions United States and the Africa Cup of Nations winners, Cameroon.

All but one of the venues was in European Russia but even so spanned four time zones. Travelling supporters faced some intimidating challenges. The journey from Kaliningrad to Yekatarinburg, for example, takes 3½ hours on a direct flight.

Group A | Group B | Group C | Group D | Group E | Group F | Group G | Group H | Knock Out Stages

| 2014 Tournament | World Cup Index |

Group A

russian flagRussia

russia 2018 world cup kit

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Designer: Adidas

There is a strong retro influence in Adidas' kits for this World Cup and the Russian Federation have, not for the first time, looked to the Soviet era for inspiration, combining predominantly red shirts and socks with white shorts.

 

saudi arabiaSaudi Arabia

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egyptEgypt

egypt 2018 world cup kit

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Designer: Adidas

Egypt last appeared in the World Cup finals in 1990. They usually wear their national colours of red, white and black. On this occasion, their Adidas shirts are embossed with a checkered pattern.

(Shorts & socks to be confirmed.)

 

uruguayUruguay

uruguay 2018 world cup kit

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Designer: Puma

There are no surprises with Puma's new design for the UAF. Traditional sky blue is teamed with black shorts and socks with no unecessary trim. The raglan sleeves extend over the V neck collar and the graphic in the centre of the shirt is inspired by the Sol de Atlántida monument in tribute to the painter, Carlos Páez Vilaró.

 

Group B

portugalPortugal

portugal 2018 world cup

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portugal 2018 world cup change kit

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Designer: Nike

Portugal are sticking with the matching deep red shirts and shorts worn with green socks that they wore two years ago when they won the Euros. The strips are updated to Nike's latest iteration of their Vapor template, which features a subtle texture effect on the sleeves and shoulders. The all-white alternative provides an excellent contrast and has tiny green crosses on the front which get larger towards the middle of the chest.

(Details to be confirmed.)

 

SpainSpain

spain 2018 world cup

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spain 2018 world cup change kit

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Designer: Adidas

The latest Spanish outfit takes the 1994 shirt as inspiration and matches this with mid blue shorts and black socks, a very welcome return to tradition. As usual, the Spanish Football Federation has asked Adidas' designers to use their imaginations to come up with an unconventional change strip. The result is a shirt in very pale blue-grey ("Halo Blue") set off with bright red applications. There is a subtle geometric pattern woven into the shirt fabric into the bargain.

(Change kit details to be confirmed.)

 

MoroccoMorocco

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Designer: Adidas

 

IranIran

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Designer:

 

Group C

FranceFrance

france 2018 world cup

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Designer: Nike

Based on Nike's new Aeroswift design, the French have a new first strip that marks a welcome return to the familiar blue, white and red look. The alternative is distinguished by small red and blue flecks on the shirt.

(Details to be confirmed.)

 

AustraliaAustralia

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Designer: Nike

 

PeruPeru

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Designer:


 

DenmarkDenmark

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Designer: Hummel

 

Group D

ArgentinaArgentina

argentina 2018 world cup finals kit

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Designer: Adidas

The new Argentina first strip is modelled on what they wore for the 1993 Copa America, the last time the team won a major honour. The sky blue stripes are adorned with a blocky chevron graphic, just to remind everyone that this is 2018.

 

IcelandIceland

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CroatiaCroatia

croatia 2018 world cup kit

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Designer: Nike

Croatia's unique checked shirts have been given a new twist with much larger squares than we are used to seeing. The design is mirrored in the navy and black version but the bright red socks look out of place on this set.

(Change kit details to be confirmed.)

 

NigeriaNigeria

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Designer: Nike


 

Group E

BrazilBrazil

brazil 2018 world cup kit

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Designer: Nike

The shade of yellow used on the new Brazil first choice shirt is slightly brighter than previous versions but otherwise the strip stays firmly with tradition.

(Shorts and socks to be confirmed.)

 

SwitzerlandSwitzerland

switzerland 2018 world cup

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Designer: Puma

Switzerland's latest red top comes with a complicated graphic that represent the topography of the Swiss Alps.

 

Costa RicaCosta Rica

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Designer: New Balance

 

SerbiaSerbia

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Designer: Umbro

 

Group F

GermanyGermany

germany 2018 world cup kit

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croatia 2018 world cup change kit

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Designer: Adidas

Adidas have reinterpreted Germany's iconic 1990 top by replacing the black, red and gold flash with a subtle black and grey graphic made up of horizontal lines of different thicknesses. The change strip features the peculiar shade of blue-green that German teams wore in the 1990s and is officially known as EQT Green, which sounds more like a food additive to me. The shirt also has a subtle geometric graphic made up from fine lines, a design feature that appears on several of Adidas' designs this year.

 

MexicoMexico

mexico 2018 world cup

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Designer: Adidas

Green shirts, white shorts and red socks are Mexico's usual combination but now in distinctively dark shades. This time round there is no spectacular graphic as the centre piece: instead we have understated graded panels on the side of the torso. The change shirt reminds me of the classic Hungary shirts worn when colours clashed in the 50s. Incidentally, Mexico wore burgundy red as first choice right up until the 1950s.

(Jack Henderson)

(Change socks to be confirmed.)

 

SwedenSweden

sweden 2018 word cup

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Designer: Adidas

Sweden, who nudged Italy out of the finals in the play-offs, can be relied upon to wear unfussy, workmanlike outfits in their traditional yellow and blue.

 

South KoreaKorea Republic

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Designer: Nike

 

Group G

BelgiumBelgium

belgium 2018 world cup

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Designer: Adidas

This is another of Adidas' designs that takes inspiration from an iconic strip from the past, in this case the 1984 shirt with Argyle graphic in the national colours. A nice touch is that the signature three-stripe trim is rendered here in a darker shade of red so as not to distract from the main motif. The change strip is expected to be basically yellow.

(Jack Henderson)

 

PanamaPanama

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Designer: New Balance

 

TunisiaTunisia

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Designer:


 

EnglandEngland

england 2018 world cup

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england 2018 world cup change kit

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Designer: Nike

It is a great relief to see the back of the dreadful Vapor designs introduced two years ago, replaced with two far more appropriate and bespoke designs that give due respect to tradition. The traditional white/navy/white first strip has a touch of red trim at the V neck while the alternative re-creates an old favourite but with a subtly rendered St George's cross graphic on the front.

(Details to be confirmed.)

 

Group H

PolandPoland

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Designer: Nike

 

SenegalSenegal

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Designer:


 

ColombiaColombia

colombia 2018 world cup kit

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Designer: Adidas

Colombia now favour navy rather than mid-blue and after adopting unfamiliar white shorts for Brazil 2014, they are once again in more traditional colours. The graphic on the tops is yet another example of how Adidas have used the striped motif to good effect. In the 70s the Colombian team wore orange shirts with a sash in the national colours and this is apparently the inspiration for the trim on the second strip. This also features a striking graphic on the shirt.

(Jack Henderson)

 

JapanJapan

japan 2018 world cup

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Designer: Adidas

While Adidas' other clients have drawn on previous and iconic strips for inspiration, the Japanese Football Association wanted the designers to use traditional samurai armour as their starting point. I don't really get it but the result does look very good.